Yankee Brew News August/September 2012 : Page 1

PEDAL Tullycross Tavern By Paul Zocco T he New Guys & Microbrewery : FOR A CAUSE spite of all the effort that goes into brewing, or perhaps because of it, brewers tend to be quite charitable. Beer is an excellent social lubricant; when shared with others, the pockets will open to support most causes. A few brewers and industry professionals take charity to limits beyond the norm by putting their own bodies to the test ... outside of the workplace. While these events generally occur during the summer, they require year-round training and organization alongside the everyday back-breaking tedium of brewing. Here are a few causes that craft beer fans can truly sup-port. IN A TULLYCROSS TABLE. Serving up a feast of food and beer at Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery in Manchester, Conn. now, my team members are so passionate that I would be a poor businessman not to let them participate in the concept’s success beyond a salary.” These words seem right out of How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying. ” A successful business is only as strong as its staff’s collective goals. Pan-Mass Challenge Massachusetts’s Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) has attracted a number of brewing industry professionals. Founded in 1980, the PMC is the largest volunteer cycling fund-raiser in the country, attracting some 5,500 cyclists from 36 states and eight countries. One hundred percent of the donations raised go to the Dana-Farber Cancer Clinic with no money taken for administration or mar-keting costs. This year’s race takes place August 4-5. The course offers 11 routes, but the most cherished one is the 192-mile original course from Sturbridge to Provincetown. The race is exciting for rider and organiz-ers and is especially rewarding for spectators who cheer the rid-ers on with fanfare similar to the Boston Marathon. Harpoon Brewery’s Jaime Schier has ridden in the PMC since 2003, dutifully riding that 192-mile original course. Schier writes in his PMC profile. “I ride in part to honor my friend, whose friendship I wish I would have made more of when I had the chance, but mostly and more importantly, I’m motivated by all the people who will never have to be sick or hurt as a result of cancer.” A few years ago, Schier joined the “Forza G” team, which has helped him in terms of inspiration and effort. To that See Pedal p. 4 By Jamie Magee recent change of ownership and facelift has occurred to a longstand-ing brewpub in Manchester, Conn. The location that formerly was John Harvard’s Brewhouse is now under new ownership as Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery. Located in the immediate vicinity of the mega Buckland Hills shopping mall, Tullycross is in easy driving distance for a feast of food and drink after a long day’s shopping. “I’m the sole owner of Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery,” said Sean Wansor. “Someday I hope to get to the point where it makes sense to have some of my key team members partic-ipate in the ownership of the concept. Right Sean’s background is not typical of a restaurateur. He had experience in hos-pitality consulting for a few years, but graduating from after gr the th University of o Colorado at Boulder with B a degree in economics and e English, he had a desire to work de in the world of investment a and finance. A banking job in Denver brought him into the presence of good beer. His apartment See Tullycross p. 6 Those Beer Drinking College Days INSIDE Event Calendar ................ 2 Tasting Panel................... 8 The Alehouse .................10 Homebrew ......................12 Beer Cooks .....................13 Maps/Directory ..........18-23 State by State News E. Massachusetts ....................14 Boston ......................................16 W. Massachusetts ...................24 Maine ........................................26 New Hampshire .......................28 Connecticut ..............................30 Vermont ....................................32 Rhode Island ............................34 NYC/Long Island ......................36 Upstate NY ...............................38

Pedal

Jamie Magee

FOR A CAUSE

IN spite of all the effort that goes into brewing, or perhaps because of it, brewers tend to be quite charitable. Beer is an excellent social lubricant; when shared with others, the pockets will open to support most causes. A few brewers and industry professionals take charity to limits beyond the norm by putting their own bodies to the test ... outside of the workplace. While these events generally occur during the summer, they require yearround training and organization alongside the everyday backbreaking tedium of brewing. Here are a few causes that craft beer fans can truly support.

Pan-Mass Challenge

Massachusetts’s Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) has attracted a number of brewing industry professionals. Founded in 1980, the PMC is the largest volunteer cycling fundraiser in the country, attracting some 5,500 cyclists from 36 states and eight countries. One hundred percent of the donations raised go to the Dana-Farber Cancer Clinic with no money taken for administration or marketing costs. This year’s race takes place August 4-5. The course offers 11 routes, but the most cherished one is the 192-mile original course from Sturbridge to Provincetown. The race is exciting for rider and organizers and is especially rewarding for spectators who cheer the riders on with fanfare similar to the Boston Marathon.

Harpoon Brewery’s Jaime Schier has ridden in the PMC since 2003, dutifully riding that 192-mile original course. Schier writes in his PMC profile. “I ride in part to honor my friend, whose friendship I wish I would have made more of when I had the chance, but mostly and more importantly, I’m motivated by all the people who will never have to be sick or hurt as a result of cancer.”

A few years ago, Schier joined the “Forza G” team, which has helped him in terms of inspiration and effort. To that End, Schier organizes an annual Porkapalooza at which team riders and friends gather to pull pork for race day sandwich fundraising. Forza G riders combined to raise over $250,000 last year. Jaime’s PMC profile can be found at www.pmc.org/profile/JS0306.

Another group, Team Beer Summit, includes Beer Summit organizers Shawn Rich, Mike Munnelly and Connor Brennan. Shawn Rich’s profile and donor link can be found online at www.pmc.org/profile/SR0135.

Bike MS

Frank Fermino of Redhook Ale Brewery rides in the 150- mile Bike MS: Ride the Rhode in Rhode Island and other states.

“If I can do something I love and help people at the same time, why not do it?” Frank said. “There are so many good causes out there. I wish I could ride for them all, but the Rhode Island MS ride sticks out not only because of the cause, but the great people I’ve met.”

Frank doesn’t ride alone. Along with his friends Ed Dutra and Gary Lanoue, Frank started Team Beer Gutz, based around fellow brewing and homebrewing friends.

“Starting with t-shirts and no goal except to finish and have fun, we raised over $4,000,” Frank said. “This year we’ve absorbed other teams, gotten cool new jerseys, gained new members and are very proud to say we raised over $25,000.”

Sadly, Lanoue, who Fermino credits for getting him started with the ride in the first place, was killed in a biking accident earlier this year. In the future, Fermino plans to honor his friend with a memorial bike tour.

“I’ll always be on a bike,” Frank said. “I ride for fun, for exercise and for stress relief. I’ll look for new opportunities to ride for personal challenges as well as helping other causes. It’s what I believe is the right thing to do. I’m sure we can all drink to that.”

Links to Frank’s causes are found at www.yankeebrew.com/unclefrank.

Tri-State Trek

The late Darryl Goss (of Cambridge Brewing Company) bravely rode in the Tri-State Trek to foster knowledge and research against ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

“Darryl was diagnosed with ALS in February 2006 and rode both the 2006 and 2007 Tri-State Trek, one of only a few ALS patients to ever ride a bicycle from Boston to New York,” said Darryl’s brother, Darin. “During his six-year battle with ALS, Darryl remained surprisingly upbeat and supportive of others.”

Eventually, when the disease overcame his ability to ride, family and friends gathered to form Team Darryl, riding their bikes for “those who no longer can.” Donations can be made at tst.als.net/goss.

Tour de Cure

Even the Brewing News has gotten into the act. Bill Metzger, founder and publisher, has organized a team to fight diabetes that has ridden the past three years in the Tour de Cure, a 62-mile ride around Oneida Lake. Metzger rides to honor his mother, who had diabetes. The 20-30 riders on the Brewing News Tour de Cure team wear Brewery Ommegang jerseys and receive gifts from the brewery to honor their participation.

“Everything that I do in life helps me to achieve my goal of drinking good beer,” Metzger said.

Donations links will be posted at www.brewingnews.com/tourdecure.

Paddling for a Purpose

Cycling is not everyone’s cup of tea, and if you live near the water, why not use its abundance for a cause? Brü Rm. @ Bar’s Jeff Browning will paddle across Long Island sound on August 11 — 16 miles, solo, through wind and waves — to raise funds and awareness for hemophilia. Browning, who suffers from the disease, admits he used to be chubby, but now pays great attention to his health. Well-wishers can ride a ferry to the finish line and enjoy a post paddle after-party with friends from Blue Point Brewing and Sierra Nevada Brewing. The event is organized by the Connecticut Hemophilia Society, with tickets and donation links online at www.cthemophilia.org.

Vermont Bount

Harpoon has its own charity rides, the B2B Brewery to Brewery ride, which took place in June, and the Point to Point, which takes place on August 11.

B2B riders head from Harpoon’s Boston brewery to its brewery in Windsor, Vt., a distance of 148 miles. After a celebration at the finish line, buses bring the riders back to Boston. Proceeds go to several causes including the Kenary Brain Tumor Research Fund at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

The Point to Point offers rides of 25, 50 and 115 miles and raises funds for the Vermont Food Bank.

Details for both rides are located at www.harpoonpointtopoint.com and www.harpoonb2b.com.

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Pedal/1137836/121333/article.html.

Tullycross Tavern

Paul Zocco

Arecent change of ownership and facelift has occurred to a longstanding brewpub in Manchester, Conn. The location that formerly was John Harvard’s Brewhouse is now under new ownership as Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery.

Located in the immediate vicinity of the mega Buckland Hills shopping mall, Tullycross is in easy driving distance for a feast of food and drink after a long day’s shopping.

“I’m the sole owner of Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery,” said Sean Wansor. “Someday I hope to get to the point where it makes sense to have some of my key team members participate in the ownership of the concept. Right now, my team members are so passionate that I would be a poor businessman not to let them participate in the concept’s success beyond a salary.”

These words seem right out of How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying.” A successful business is only as strong as its staff’s collective goals.

Those Beer Drinking College Days

Sean’s background is not typical of a restaurateur. He had experience in hospitality consulting for a few years, but a f t e r graduating from the University of Colorado at Boulder with a degree in economics and English, he had a desire to work in the world of investment and finance. A banking job in Denver brought him into the presence of good beer. His apartment On 16th and Stout (no pun intended) was located in an area called LoDo, or Lower Downtown, a Denver neighborhood literally paved with brewpubs and breweries. Frank Day of Rock Bottom Brewpub fame had a big influence on Sean’s future business plan with Tullycross. Being around so much craft beer, Sean must have caught the beer bug there. He said his main reasons for starting Tullycross were his love for good beer and an inborn ability to put that passion into a market that can grow and become very profitable.

Having a business background and experience in banking matters, obtaining the funds for this new venture was a bit easier for him. Also, his father was in the real estate business, so there was good advice. Tim Morse, a personal friend and past Head Brewer of the John Harvard chain of brewpubs, influenced Sean by giving him the insights of years of brewing experience and running a successful tavern.

“As we develop the Tullycross Tavern and Microbrewery concept,” Sean said, we believe our up-market Irish Tavern theme can effectively fill a void of this type of establishment in the Northeast. The palate for good culinary creations has always been strong, but now its thirst for good craft beer is catching up. We’re positioning ourselves to meet the growing demands for fine culinary cuisine paired with awesome beer.”

Sean’s plans are to build an outdoor café this year directly adjacent to the pub. Tullycross will continue to have its Mug Club and will present new “Premium Awards” programs. A future of special wine events with a local winery is in the planning stages. There is also discussion of a startup distillery in the future as are plans of expanding the business with new taverns In the New York and Boston corridor. The Manchester location will be the geographical center of possible future openings. Other locations in Connecticut and Massachusetts are being looked at, with possible openings in New Hampshire and Maine.

Having a Beer with The Bard

Outside of business life, Sean is a student of the writings of Shakespeare, Emerson and Yeats. His plans are to write a book of poetry one day that includes topics of cancer, business, family and romance. Beer wasn’t mentioned in that conversation, but I think that will also be a future theme. Sean spends quality time bicycle riding as a way to regenerate his batteries after the stresses and duties of being a restaurateur.

Homebrewer Gone Pro

Friend and fellow homebrewer Brian Flach has taken on the reins as brewer. His past experience as a homebrewer gave him the artistic license to create particular beers in their classic style. Although Tullycross is by name an Irish-themed tavern, by no means will one find only Irish stouts and red ales on tap. Brewer Flach has developed American, Belgian, German and English-style ales and lagers that match the season and the cuisine.

Under the guidance of Rob Leonard, owner and brewer of New England Brewing Company of Woodbridge, Conn., Brian volunteered his time learning the brewing trade as brew helper, keg washer, canner and general grunt. This lasted for about a year and a half, giving Brian valuable time and experience to learn his way around a brewery. After a year away from commercial brewing, Brian received a call from the then Head Brewer at John Harvard’s, Tim Morse, saying that the new Tullycross operation may be in need of a brewer. Brian wisely jumped at the opportunity and hooked up with Sean.

After some discussion and planning, Brian set a plan in place to have a base of four beers always available at Tullycross, with occasional seasonal and special brews made to match the seasons. Being an Irish tavern, there would of course always be an Irish stout and a red ale, but Brian’s homebrewing background came to life. The following are a few that will be Tullycross’s flagship beers and most often available. Silk City Stout is a 4.9% ABV dry stout brewed with four malts and hopped with Fuggles hops. The 5.3% Irish Red Ale contains Maris Otter pale malt blended with roasted barley, various caramel malts and a generous dose of East Kent Goldings hops. Pale Ale is a traditional 5. 5 % American pale ale brewed with three malts and hopped with both Warrior and Cascade hops. For those that like a crisp lager, Tavern Light at 4.7% is a light bodied pilsner brewed with only pilsner malt and hopped with Tettnanger and Saaz hops, a typical recipe of classic European lagers. A continuing series of IPAs will always be on tap in different versions in a series called “Flux” IPA. The IPA on tap in June was a 6. 2% hoppy ale brewed with three malts and hopped with Cascade and Warrior hops. This summer there will also be a Vienna Lager and a dry Belgian Saison on tap.

As far as seasonal beers available throughout the year, Brian’s probable lineup might include several beers: a traditional spring Maibock (6.6%) brewed with pilsner and Munich malts and hopped with German Tettnanger; for summer and early fall, an 8.9% double IPA brewed with four malts and hopped generously (119 IBUs) with Simcoe, Amarillo, Centennial and Columbus hops; later in the fall, a seasonal Pumpkin Spice ale at 6.2% brewed with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and ginger and a modest Fuggles hopping of only 15 IBUs (like the liquid form of a pumpkin pie); a typical malty 5.9% Octoberfest brewed with the traditional German pilsner, Munich, Vienna and CaraMunich malts and hopped moderately with Hallertauer hops; and for those cold nights, a seasonal winter strong ale (10.1%) called Siberian Winter Imperial Stout brewed with six malts and 85 IBUs of Chinook hops.

The Details

The Brewery: Pub system Brewery Capacity: 14 barrels with seven, seven-barrel fermenters

Beers are available on draft at the tavern or growlers to go

Tullycross: the name comes from a small village in Northern Ireland from where Sean’s descendants originated. Also, it’s the middle name of his father.

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Tullycross+Tavern/1137840/121333/article.html.

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