Yankee Brew News October/November 2012 : Page 1

by the Sea Cape Ann Bartender Ali Peloquin tends the taps in Gloucester, Massachusetts. PHOTO BY JEN HARMON ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM By Jen Harmon By Elizabeth Keyser eer dinners boring? Says who? No one loves a good time more than craft beer drink-ers and brewers. Chefs and restaurateurs keep inventing new ways to gather together and enjoy beer. Like spend-ing a weekend not just eating and tasting, but doing and participating — making beer or foraging for ingredients. Or buying tick-ets to a “tournament” of biweekly pairings by competing breweries. Or eating food you’ve always been afraid to try (does alli-gator really taste like chicken?). Or splurg-ing on a four-star meal paired with rare and vintage brews not available to the public. Beer dinners started as a way to legiti-mize, celebrate and market craft beers and the restaurants that champion them. The Next Generation of Beer Dinners is interac-tive and experiential. “Today people are more interested in doing something out of the ordinary,” said Alanna Mayer, Sales and Marketing Director of the Norwich Inn in Norwich, Vt. The historic inn holds an annual Brewer’s Weekend, which includes two nights at the inn, featuring a beer brewing session with the inn’s brewmaster, Jeremy Hebert. Guests sample cheese and beer pairings and attend a “brewer’s banquet” created by Hebert and Chef Carl Hingston. The banquet in the inn’s restaurant and microbrewery, Jasper Murdock’s Ale House, has an educational component as Hebert and Hingston talk about the pairings. Chef Hingston cooks with the beer as well as pairs it with his dishes. He has creatively dressed salad in lemongrass-weizen vinaigrette, which he pairs with his Jasper Murdock NORwizINN. The Norwich Inn also has a “Bake and Brew” weekend package that includes a brewing session and a bread baking lesson. See Dinners p. 3 Bake and Brew When the Towers fell on September 11, 2001, Cape Ann Brewing Co. founder and owner Jeremy Goldberg was working on Wall Street in New York City, and had been for three years. “I was one of those people walk-ing across the bridge, covered in soot,” Goldberg said. “After that, I wanted to do more than just push money around.” Goldberg quit his job and tried to figure out what to do next. Meanwhile, his former roommate, filmmaker (and future Barcade owner) Paul Kermizian, decided to make a documentary about craft beer in America. He asked Jeremy to participate. “I had no job, so I said sure,” Goldberg said. Goldberg and Kermizian were joined by Rick Sterling, Jon Miller and Rob Purvis. They set off from Brooklyn in a minivan and visited 38 breweries in 40 days. The movie was called American Beer . They See Cape Ann p. 6 Jeremy Goldberg and his dog, Bubba, the namesake of Fisherman’s Bubba’s Brew. PHOTO BY HOLLIE CHADWICK INSIDE Event Calendar ................ 2 Tasting Panel................... 8 Homebrew ......................12 Beer Cooks .....................13 Maps/Directory ..........18-23 State E. Massachusetts ....................14 by State Boston ......................................16 W. Massachusetts ...................24 News Maine ........................................26 New Hampshire .......................28 Connecticut ..............................30 Vermont ....................................32 Rhode Island ............................34 NYC/Long Island ......................36 Upstate NY ...............................38

Beer Dinners: The Next Generation

Elizabeth Keyser

Beer dinners boring? Says who? No one loves a good time more than craft beer drinkers and brewers. Chefs and restaurateurs keep inventing new ways to gather together and enjoy beer. Like spending a weekend not just eating and tasting, but doing and participating — making beer or foraging for ingredients. Or buying tickets to a “tournament” of biweekly pairings by competing breweries. Or eating food you’ve always been afraid to try (does alligator really taste like chicken?). Or splurging on a four-star meal paired with rare and vintage brews not available to the public.

Beer dinners started as a way to legitimize, celebrate and market craft beers and the restaurants that champion them. The Next Generation of Beer Dinners is interactive and experiential.

Bake and Brew

“Today people are more interested in doing something out of the ordinary,” said Alanna Mayer, Sales and Marketing Director of the Norwich Inn in Norwich, Vt. The historic inn holds an annual Brewer’s Weekend, which includes two nights at the inn, featuring a beer brewing session with the inn’s brewmaster, Jeremy Hebert. Guests sample cheese and beer pairings and attend a “brewer’s banquet” created by Hebert and Chef Carl Hingston. The banquet in the inn’s restaurant and microbrewery, Jasper Murdock’s Ale House, has an educational component as Hebert and Hingston talk about the pairings. Chef Hingston cooks with the beer as well as pairs it with his dishes. He has creatively dressed salad in lemongrass-weizen vinaigrette, which he pairs with his Jasper Murdock NORwizINN.

The Norwich Inn also has a “Bake and Brew” weekend package that includes a brewing session and a bread baking lesson The bread is served at Saturday’s beer tasting dinner. King Aurthur’s Flour, located nearby, is a sponsor. The Inn also offers a weekday special “Ales at the Inn,” featuring samples of Jasper Murdock Ales.

Fungi Fest

Foraging with a mushroom expert preceded a “Fungi Fest” beer dinner held September 29 at American Flatbread in Waitsville, Vt. Guests gathered at the restaurant in the afternoon and set off on a hike to celebrate the opening of Revolution Trail, a new one-and-a-half-mile trail that leads to Dana Forest Farm, which cultivates shitake mushrooms. Along the way they hunted for chanterelles, porcini, oyster and lobster mushrooms with mycologist John Atkinson.
At Dana Forest Farm, mushroom farmer Nick Laskovski explained how he grows the shitakes. At 6 p.m., back at the restaurant, the guests sat down to a five-course mushroom- centric dinner using the local, foraged and cultivated mushrooms. The menu and beer pairings were not set by press time. One thing was certain though: they’d use local brewers, said Clay Westbrook, President and General Manager of American Flatbread.

Beer Wars

Sports was the inspiration for Arthur Landis, Executive Chef at McCormick & Schmick’s restaurant in Faneuil Hall, Boston. Beer Wars was “set up like an NCAA basketball tournament,” Landis said. Now in its third season, Landis added that the series of beer dinners is “wildly popular … we have a huge following.”

Every other Friday from September through April, two regional (from Maine to Pennsylvania) brewers are pitted against one another in matching their beers to five courses. The diners choose the winner. Sixteen breweries participated last year. Peak Organic of Portland, Maine, won the season championship.

Chef Landis said the beer dinners are fun for him — he gets to be creative with the food and it gets him out of the kitchen and into the dining room as he and the brewers explain the pairings.

“I do kooky, off-beat dishes like tomato Caprese with mango purée and raspberry balsamic reduction,” Landis said.

He’s also done courses as simple and classic as house-made Bavarian pretzels and mustard.

“The dinners are more about the beer than the food, and the pairings are more fun than they are ‘proper,’” Landis said, “Sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t.”

In the final round, the food is more elevated and the $55 charge is raised to $65, as befitting a course featuring lobster in a rich buerre blanc sauce. The upcoming season runs from September through April, every other Friday night.

Brew n’ Bacon

In Stamford, Conn., Coalhouse Pizza and Victory Brewing drummed up excitement by getting bloggers on board for a “Victory Brews & Bacon” dinner. Kristien and Dan Del Ferraro of OmNoMCT, a blog covering lower Fairfield County, were invited to create a menu focusing on bacon and to create pairings using Victory brews. Coalhouse’s chef and cooks created the Del Ferraro’s menu. Victory brews were used in the dishes, as well. Golden Monkey Trippel, a strong (9.5% ABV) Belgian-style ale, lent a hint of malt and hops to the Golden Monkey pizza dough, the base for a sweet and spicy (habanero-fired) Hawaiian pizza paired with Golden Monkey Trippel.

“The dough that night had a slightly ‘heavier’ kind of taste, with perhaps a little sweetness like a sourdough, because Golden Monkey is a tad sweet. It’s difficult to describe, but it went really well with the pineapple and the habanero,” Kristien said.

Hop Devil accompanied the “Smokey the Beer” bacon burger slider accompanied by — what else? — beer-battered onion rings. For dessert, guests devoured salted caramel brownies accompanied by a Harry Potter inspired “butterbeer” made with Storm King stout. The sweetened and whipped cream topped liquid dessert got mixed reviews from the bloggers who attended the meal. Some gave it points for creativity; other’s called it “vile.”

At $55 a head, Brews & Bacon was so popular (75 guests attended), the bloggers and Coalhouse did it again — this time with Dogfish Head’s Ancient Awesome Ales paired with the Del Ferraro’s seafood menu.

“This was a tougher one because the Dogfish Head Ancient Ales are more exotic, so the pairings are more difficult,” said Dan Del Ferraro. “Luckily, Dogfish Head saw our menu and paired it for us.”

What to pair with Dogfish’s Ta Henket, a recipe based on Egyptian hieroglyphics using ancient wheat and fermented with “natural Egyptian Yeast from the night air of Cairo”? The Del Ferraro’s Roasted Corn and Beer Chowder, of course. The meal cost $75 per person.

Wild Game Nights

Beer dinners get wild at The City Beer Hall in Albany, N.Y. Wild Game Nights feature meats like alligator, kangaroo, llama and wild boar. Executive Chef Dimitrios Menagias paired a four-course meal with beer from breweries such as Sixpoint, Ithaca Beer Co., Ommegang and Stone. The wild game dinners cost $50 a person and are so popular (drawing up to 75 people), that owner Kaelin Ballinger has been running them about once a month for the last year.

“They’ve been a huge success,” Ballinger said. “People like that it’s a little exotic and that we’re pairing craft breweries that are on the same high level as the food.”

Reviewing the dishes he’s eaten at the dinners in the last year, what stands out? The chocolate porter cake with whisky buttercream and wild-boar bacon that had been dipped in chocolate. “People loved that,” Ballinger said. It was paired with Gorilla Warfare Coffee Porter, a dark, roasty, chocolatey brew from Sixpoint Brewery.

Ballinger believes the market for out-of the- ordinary beer dinners is growing.

“As craft beer becomes more mainstream, the demand for good food comes with it,” Ballinger said. “Our beer dinners are customized for our patrons. It’s personalized, not mass-produced.”

Kangaroo and Hops

A recent dinner with Sixpoint Brewery of Brooklyn, N.Y., presented an intriguing menu, which began with Apollo, a seasonal summer Bavarian wheat ale. The clove flavor profile was picked up by the roasted squab seasoned with cardamom, coriander and fennel seed and topped with clove crema.

A cask-conditioned, dry-hopped (Cascade) version of Sixpoint’s Brownstone Ale, with its notes of roasted barley, toast and chocolate, was served with grilled kangaroo topped with balsamic brown butter and shitake mushroom sauce. Baby bok choi was sautéed in Cascade-hop infused olive oil.

Una Comida de la Cerveza

Paul Zocco’s recent beer dinner opened eyes to unknown Hispanic beers. “Most Hispanic beers are light and get a bad rap as flavorless drinks,” Zocco said. Not so the Estrella Inedit, a white beer he paired with a tomato-based seafood soup.

Zocco, a Yankee Brew News columnist, and owner of Zok’s Homebrewing and Winemaking Supplies in Willimantic, Conn., collaborated with a Suso’s Latino Basket, a Manchester, Conn. Restaurant featuring the food of South America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal. Zocco and Chef Suso Seoane tested all the dishes to make sure the matches were just right. They paired baked lamb, flavored with rosemary and garlic, with Negra Modelo, a Mexican dark lager. The dessert, a dark chocolate mousse, was flavored with Coral, a sweet stout from Portugal. It was served with Coral as well.

“I don’t think that even one of the attendees had any idea of the various “new” family of Spanish beers that are now available,” Zok said. “They all left with smiles and a new understanding of non-typical Spanish beers that are out there.”

Ultimate Gourmet Beer Dinners

When it comes to the ultimate gourmet beer dinners, Garrett Oliver takes the … cask. The Brewmaster of Brooklyn Brewery has been involved with over 800 beer dinners, most notably with world-class restaurants like 11 Madison Park and Per Se in New York City, and Noma in Copenhagen. What will $150 get you at a Garrett Oliver beer dinner at four-star 11 Madison Park?

How about special, rare and vintage beers not available to the public, such as Wild 1, a variation of Local 1 aged in bourbon barrels and refermented with the wild yeast strain Brettanomyces. And Local 11, a collaboration between the restaurant and the brewery — a dark Belgian-style abbey beer aged in whiskey barrels. But not just any whiskey barrels, barrels that held a 20-yearold Pappy Van Winkle, which some consider to be one of the best whiskeys in the world. To get enough of the rare 2003 Black Stout that Chef Humm wanted to serve with dessert, Brooklyn Brewery had to buy back bottles from the public.

The beers were paired with meticulously crafted dishes by acclaimed Chef Daniel Humm such as foie gras terrine with strawberry yuzo and black pepper (paired with Wild 1), and Four Story Hill suckling pig with apricot and cardamom (paired with Local 11). Chef Humm’s pristine platings are almost too beautiful to eat.

As a final send-off, a Garrett Oliver-11 Madison Park dinner ended with a plate of delicate cookies — pistachio-green macaroons — accompanied by the very last barrels of Black Ops, a 2007 vintage imperial stout that Brooklyn Brewery never sold to the public.

Beer drinkers want more than food and beer pairings. They want experiences. Given the creativity of the craft beer world, beer dinners will never grow stale.

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Beer+Dinners%3A+The+Next+Generation/1202127/129291/article.html.

Craft Beer

Jen Harmon

by the Sea

When the Towers fell on September 11, 2001, Cape Ann Brewing Co. Founder and owner Jeremy Goldberg was working on Wall Street in New York City, and had been for three years.

“I was one of those people walking across the bridge, covered in soot,”

Goldberg said. “After that, I wanted to do more than just push money around.” Goldberg quit his job and tried to figure out what to do next. Meanwhile, his former roommate, filmmaker (and future Barcade owner) Paul Kermizian, decided to make a documentary about craft beer in America. He asked Jeremy to participate.

“I had no job, so I said sure,” Goldberg said.

Goldberg and Kermizian were joined by Rick Sterling, Jon Miller and Rob Purvis. They set off from Brooklyn in a minivan and visited 38 breweries in 40 days. The movie was called American Beer. They Traveled over 10,000 miles and interviewed craft beer pioneers at breweries such as Brooklyn, Allagash, Dogfish Head, Bell’s and New Glarus. The movie also documented their adventures along the way, including all of the expected drunken shenanigans that go with 40 straight days of beer drinking.

“About halfway through the trip, I decided I wanted to be part of the beer industry,” Kermizian said while sitting on the deck of his Gloucester brewery. “The other guys were doubtful I could do it. It’s funny now. I just liked the communal relationship in the craft beer industry. There was no competition, just people wanting to get beer out there.”

In July 2002, an eBay listing for a brewhouse system prompted a conversation between Goldberg, his former brother-inlaw, Mike and his father. Goldberg and Mike decided to start a brewery, and his father would invest in it.

“We looked to consultants at first,” Goldberg said. “We were incorporated by November, we gathered the equipment by September 2003 and released our first batch in May 2004.”

City by the Sea

Gloucester, an oceanside city on Cape Ann, was an easy choice for the location of the brewery.

“Mike owned a warehouse in Gloucester,” Goldberg said. “It was a burgeoning area and had a nice environment. There’s a strong story and history. It worked well with what we were doing. At the time, there was just Ipswich Brewing and some brewpubs up here (north of Boston). Since we’ve been here, nearby places have added more beer varieties, and there are more places that exclusively feature craft beer.”

The People Behind the Beer

The first person Goldberg hired for Cape Ann was TJ Peckham. Soon after, Peckham’s good friends, Dylan L’abbe- Lindquist and Tom Ryan, joined the team.
Peckham grew up in nearby Rockport and started homebrewing after college. He moved to Corvallis, Ore., and started working in the beer industry.

“It was in this city that my commercial brewing experience began,” Peckham said. “I started off painting and helping around Oregon Trail Brewery. My boss also owned Freshhops.com, so I was able to work out in hops fields and really get serious hands-on experience.”

“I got into homebrewing and beer in general when TJ left me all his homebrew equipment,” Ryan said. “When he moved cross-country to Oregon, he didn’t have space in the car for it.”

In 2005, Peckham started commercially fishing out of Alaska’s Dutch Harbor on the Bering Sea.

“It was before the show Deadliest Catch had started,” Peckham said, “so I had no idea what I was in for. I did this for three seasons with average shifts of 18 hours to as many as 57 hour shifts straight. Each trip lasted over 30 days on average, often in waves from 20 to sometimes 50 feet. AKA a long time without a beer.”

When Peckham returned to Massachusetts, he told Ryan all about his adventures.

“He told me how the manual labor was crazy, about the ridiculous hours and how dangerous every minute was,” Ryan said. “With that, we decided to go do another season together.”

Prior to leaving, they had really gotten into homebrewing. They started a homebrew club and began to pursue the idea of brewing on a larger scale.

“We brought books about homebrewing, how to start a brewery, and kept a journal of ideas that would come to our heads during the 18 hour work shifts,” Ryan said. “We were out there from the end of August until the end of November.”

While at sea, they received a letter from Peckham’s mother about the opening of a new brewery in Gloucester.

“Their beer was called Fisherman’s Brew!” Ryan said. “We were supposed to stay on the ship and clean it while en route to Seattle. When we heard about the brewery in Gloucester, we literally jumped ship!”

Peckham started working as a salesman for Cape Ann soon after they returned. Ryan briefly returned to the world of finance until Cape Ann was able to take on a second salesman. They’ve been there ever since, Peckham as Captain O’Sails and Ryan as First Mate O’Sails. Their good friend L’abbe-Lindquist left a background in geology to join the team and is now the head brewer.

Brian Fines is the assistant brewer, and he also handles sales in his home state of Rhode Island. Amit Ram is an apprentice brewer from Israel. Ram recently won two medals in the Samuel Adams’ LongShot Homebrew Competition.

“We’re still a pretty small brewery and are all really close,” Ryan said. “I think having the brewpub adds so much to the brewery. The closeness extends over to the brewpub staff from the general managers, bartenders, chefs and even the expediter.”

The Beer Behind the People

Goldberg decided to honor the city of Gloucester through the naming of Cape Ann’s beers. Cape Ann also donates to the Northeast Seafood Coalition.

“As far as Fisherman’s, the name was in honor of Gloucester and its history as America’s oldest fishing port,” Goldberg said “The theme should continue for the foreseeable future.”

Cape Ann’s first beer was Fisherman’s Brew, a well-balanced American amber lager. The other two yearround beers are Fisherman’s Ale, a crisp and refreshing German-style Kölsch, and Fisherman’s IPA, a wellbalanced beer with a floral.

Hoppy nose. It’s hopped with Chinook and Sorachi Ace. Cape Ann’s fall seasonal is Fisherman’s Pumpkin Stout (7.0% ABV), a dark beer brewed with real pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice. Fisherman’s Navigator (7.0%) is a German-style doppelbock and the winter seasonal.

Right now, Cape Ann’s bottled beers are brewed and bottled at Olde Saratoga Brewing in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Goldberg also sees Cape Ann someday getting into canning its beers.

Over the years, Cape Ann has produced around 30 different beers. The brewpub features 12 draft lines.

“I love diversity and we keep that flowing on all 12 lines at all times,” Ryan said.

One of the popular brews offered at the pub is Sunrise Saison (7.0%). This was Cape Ann’s first foray into Belgian-style beers and was based on a recipe from Mr. Jumpers Homebrew Club. It’s brewed with 150 pounds of rhubarb and 250 pounds of whole strawberries.

“I tell people it’s like a rollercoaster on your tongue going from the sweet taste of the strawberries to the tart rhubarb kick, then finishing off with the strawberry flavor,” Ryan said. “The saison yeast we use gives it a great aftertaste, as well.”

Cape Ann has also brewed beers that reflect its oceanfront location. Fisherman’s Oyster Stout was brewed with hundreds of crushed oyster shells in the mash.

“The result was a roasty stout with a rich body and smooth mouthfeel to go with its unique flavor and aroma,” Goldberg said.

Fisherman’s Clam Porter (6.5%) is a robust porter brewed with 150 pounds of surf clam shells. The result is a moderately malty flavor with a roasty dryness in the finish.

This time of year, Cape Ann’s seasonal Fisherman’s Pumpkin Stout (7.0%) and Fisherman’s Imperial Pumpkin Stout (11. 0%) are popular.

“Once the hot weather subsides, I’m all about the Pumpkin Stout,” Ryan said. “It’s more of a stout than a pumpkin beer, but appeals to both crowds. I’ll step it up to an Imperial Pumpkin Stout if I feel like adding a stronger buzz to my evening.”

Peckham and Ryan have another partner in their quest to bring Cape Ann beer to the people, and her name is Tessy. Tessy is a 1978 Volkswagen bus painted Fenway Park Green Monster green, complete with tap handles mounted on the side.

“The bus was an entire adventure of its own,” Peckham said. “Tom and I thought it up while fishing, and I had it built in Oregon for me. I picked the bus up and met Tom in New Orleans after breaking down on my own about eight times on the way from Oregon. Tessy now runs like a gem, and so does our business.”

A Beer with a View

In late December 2011, the entire Cape Ann operation moved across the street into a larger location directly on the water. A fullservice kitchen headed by Chef Fernando DeSouza was added, making Cape Ann a full-fledged brewpub.

“The move has been tremendous. It’s really allowed us to spread our wings,” Goldberg said. “It’s a phenomenal location on the water, and it’s got something for everyone.”

“What makes it really special is that the public is able to feel like they are a part of the brewery by coming in to hang out, drink and eat,” Ryan said. “Plus, Fernando’s food is fantastic.”

The move didn’t provide more brewing capacity right away, but the recent addition of a 55-barrel fermentation tank will allow Cape Ann to be more efficient.

“Our capacity is maxed-out in the summertime,” Goldberg said. “We’re looking to continue growing in the facility. We’d like to get more specialty brews out there. We want to focus on those.”

Cape Ann Brewing currently distributes as far south as Virginia.

“We focus on Massachusetts, New York and Rhode Island, and we’re now available in New Hampshire,” Goldberg said. “We recently pulled out of Maine and Pennsylvania. We’re focusing on providing good service to our accounts.”

Visitors to the brewpub can request a brewery tour at the bar, and the bartenders will provide samples of the beers to help patrons decide from the 12 beers on draft. Growlers of Cape Ann beer are also available to take home.

“We’ve had some beer dinners here, and hope to do more,” Goldberg said. “We’ve Done beer dinners at other restaurants, too.
We have Open Mic Night on Thursdays and live music Friday through Sunday. We also do Dine and Donate nights where a percentage of the gross goes to a specific charity.”

Sailing Ahead

The future of Cape Ann Brewing definitely includes the waterfront brewpub.

“We would never get rid of the brewpub,” Goldberg said. “There might be a new production facility someday. Maybe we’ll bring in a bottling line.”

Cape Ann Brewing
11 Rogers Street
Gloucester, Mass.
866-BEER-MEN
or 978-282-7399
www.capeannbrewing.com.

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Craft+Beer/1202133/129291/article.html.

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