Yankee Brew News December 2015/January 2016 : Page 1

L-R: Garrison City Beerworks Assistant Brewer Nicole Gray, co-owner Mike Nadeau, Head Brewer Gabe Rogers and tasting room manager Kate Rogers. PHOTO BY SCOTT KAPLAN By Malcolm F. Purinton ILLUSTRATIONS BY HANS GRANHEIM R — they are making it easy to order beer, wine or distilled orde spirits for quick and easy spiri delivery within an hour. You no have to ask friends to pick longer hav up more booze on the way to a party or head out yourself pa to pick up those bottles you forgot on your way home. And if any snow-storms are keeping you sto from going out, you can just sit in the dry warmth of your See Delivery p. 4 ight at the edge of Dover, N.H.’s Upper Square sits Garrison City Beerworks. Named after the nickname of the City of Dover, it’s one of the state’s newest nano breweries. Owners Gabe Rogers and Mike Nadeau run the brewery and business together with Assistant Brewer Nicole Gray and Rogers’ wife Kate, who is the tasting room General Manager. Rogers grew up in Wolfeboro, See Garrison p. 5 Case of Beer. Delivery, please. ase. W e’re using our phones for a lot ot of things these days from order-ing a ride with Uber or Lyft to o finding a place to stay for a vacation in another person’s home with Airbnb b to ordering food, shoes and other needs eds or desires via numerous Internet shopping pping apps and websites. However, there are several new phone apps that are doing something that is quite extraordinary and rather exciting By Scott Kaplan Lone Wolfe Brewery owner/brewer Graham Combes at home behind his bar. PHOTO BY SCOTT KAPLAN INSIDE Events Calendar....... 2 Beer Cooks .............. 6 The Alehouse ........... 9 Tasting Panel ......... 10 Homebrew .............. 12 Maps/Directory .. 18-23 State by State News E. Massachusetts ..........14 Boston ............................16 W. Massachusetts .........24 Maine ..............................26 New Hampshire .............28 Connecticut ....................30 Vermont ..........................32 Rhode Island ..................34 NYC/Long Island ............36 Upstate NY .....................38 T he idea started out as one-man with a one-barrel brewery in Wolfeboro, N.H., so it was kind of a no-brainer for brewer-owner Graham Combes to name his brewery Lone Wolfe. “It was a fool-hardy decision,” Combes said of the name, but it stuck. How he got there is a bit more protracted. Combes is originally from Ohio, and he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Visual Journalism from the Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, Calif., in 2009. While there he met his wife, Jen, in the same program. See Lone Wolfe p. 8 By Scott Kaplan

Beer Delivery!

Malcolm F. Purinton

ILLUSTRATIONS BY HANS GRANHEIM

Case of Beer. Delivery, please.

We’re using our phones for a lot of things these days from ordering a ride with Uber or Lyft to finding a place to stay for a vacation in another person’s home with Airbnb to ordering food, shoes and other needs or desires via numerous Internet shopping apps and websites. However, there are several new phone apps that are doing something that is quite extraordinary and rather exciting — they are making it easy to order beer, wine or distilled spirits for quick and easy delivery within an hour. You no longer have to ask friends to pick up more booze on the way to a party or head out yourself to pick up those bottles you forgot on your way home. And if any snowstorms are keeping you from going out, you can just sit in the dry warmth of your home while you wait for that six-pack to come to you.

Many liquor stores have been doing delivery for years, but it can be time consuming for both the stores and the customer to use the phone and deal with questions about what is available, maybe offer suggestions and then order and pay. Some alcohol delivery apps, such as Boston-based Drizly, have the ability to be tied into the store’s inventory so that you know exactly what is available, do a search, see suggestions for other purchases and more. Many people, especially after last winter’s snowstorms, have found that alcohol delivery apps are convenient and save a lot of time. Many stores have also found them to be good at increasing sales with the added benefits of customer and distributor loyalties.

“That exists?!”

This is the most oft-repeated question that Karli Del Rossi, Drizly’s Boston General Manager, hears. In a city where happy hours are illegal, how is it possible that alcohol delivery at any time could work? Well, they took the time and effort to figure it out, and we know it is legal and it’s working.

The way it works for Drizly, one of the more popular and far-reaching alcohol delivery apps, is that stores subscribe to their service and Drizly itself doesn’t handle any of the money or alcohol during purchasing. Instead, they provide the platform and support to connect the customers with the liquor stores, making sure everything runs smoothly from your smartphone to your front door including providing their own proprietary age verification tool to make sure no one under 21 is buying or receiving any alcohol. While there is a $5 delivery fee and a $20 minimum for purchase, there is no added markup by the store, and many stores offer first-delivery promo codes for free deliveries.

There are also several ways purchases can be made via Drizly’s website or smartphone app on Android- or Apple-supported operating systems. First, you can make your purchase for immediate delivery: “I want these items, now.” Second, you can plan ahead three to four days in advance and the store will pull your items aside for the planned delivery date and time. Or third, you can purchase a gift for a friend in your city or another that Drizly delivers in, and then your friend will be contacted to decide when a delivery could be made, based on their own schedule.

The Liquor Store

Charles Street Liquors in Boston has been delivering alcohol around Beacon Hill for over 15 years. The store has had a small but loyal customer base of people from the surrounding neighborhood throughout this time. Many people are regulars who will come into the store, choose their selections and have them delivered later. Or they will call in, many with regular, weekly orders for boxes of wine or some beers and a bottle of bourbon, but things changed this past winter once Charles Street Liquors decided to work with the alcohol delivery company, Drizly.

It was a bit of a slow start back in December 2014 and January 2015 with only a rise from about four to seven local deliveries up to 10 to 14 daily. Then came the snowiest winter ever. Combined with a greater marketing presence around Boston, Charles Street saw a nearly ten-fold increase in deliveries that has continued without slowing. The store now regularly sees over 40 deliveries daily between Monday and Wednesday while the weekends are upwards of 70 online/phone orders. Charles Street has gone from one to two regular cars for deliveries and is looking at even purchasing a motor scooter for more.

“We actually just bought a huge backpack,” said Bill Hall, Charles Street’s Beer Specialist, “that I have personally fit a case of beer, several wines and a couple bottles of bourbon in and hiked around the city just to deliver.”

With this, Charles Street is meeting the growing delivery demand with average delivery times under an hour.

An additional bonus for the store, aside from increased sales, is the increased availability for special releases from distributers. Hall said that working with Drizly for alcohol delivery “allows us to … move more product, bringing more product in. The more we do that, the better our distributers like us, the better our allotment of specialty wines, unique spirits and amazing craft beer.” This means that with some hard to find beers, like Long Trail Brewery’s Space Juice or bottles and cans from Night Shift Brewing, Charles Street is able to sell three or four cans instead of one per customer “and our customers love that.”

Who’s Buying?

So, who is jumping on this alcohol delivery bandwagon? There are certainly many younger 21+ customers ordering more drinks for a party or to restock before or during a snowstorm. But, it’s not just the early- to mid-20-somethings that are hip to these new apps. There is a large variety of people who have been finding it pretty easy to do their alcohol purchasing online or on their phones. For instance, Charles Street Liquors has found that many regular orders come from older customers who find the apps easier and more convenient than walking to the store and carrying their purchases home. In addition, with Charles Street’s coverage area including the Financial District, there are many corporate clients who order three to four days ahead for meetings or events for their office or clients.

How Does it Work?

It’s actually quite simple according to Hall at Charles Street. The first step is going online either via a computer or smartphone app and setting up a profile that includes an address. With the address, you’re then paired with the store closest to you and its inventory of tasty libations (about 3,000 items including over 1,300 craft beers if you’re part of the Charles Street Liquors delivery area). Once you’ve made your selections of beer, wine, distilled spirits, mixers, etc. and add whatever you want to your “cart,” you then pay with a credit or debit card just as you would buying socks or a book on Amazon. Then you wait and relax.

What happens while you’re sitting quietly at your place watching TV or making dinner is that the store has received a text with your order. At the store, this text shows up on its main computer and on all of the other electronics that are tied into the system. The person working at the store will then click “Accept Order,” go around the store pulling everything you want and then ring it up on the system and charge the order. The Drizly app includes a checklist of your order that the store is able to check off as it grabs everything from the isles. Once the order is packed and passed onto the driver, the driver will click on “Driving,” so that you know your order is on its way. You can even view where they are on your phone, just like with Uber. This whole process only takes about 20 to 60 minutes, sometimes even less.

Is it all Good?

For the most part, customers and stores that have paired up with alcohol delivery companies have found alcohol delivery to be a positive experience. There are certainly some people, such as Quinlan Corbett, an actor in New York City, who are worried about what could happen to those stores who are not part of delivery services.

“I’d be sad for online liquor sales to diminish from what right now in New York City is such a boom of small, curated wine and liquor stores that are offering such interesting unknown wines and spirits, a lot of which are cryptically labeled to the average buyer, so a hand-sell is important. I'd be sad for some of these to dry up.”

However, these stores also have the option to be part of a delivery app and, like Charles Street Liquors has found, the boost in delivery sales could lead to better availability for specialty selections.

Where Does it Work?

Unfortunately these services are, for now, available only in or near larger cities like Boston and New York, but some apps like Drizly have expanded to include Worcester, Mass., Long Island, N.Y., and Providence, R.I. They are also available in 14 other cities in the U.S. Some other alcohol delivery apps are also available in some regions in Canada, such as Thirstie. Other apps include Minibar, Saucy and Klink, which deal with their own regional markets and are also attempting to expand across North America.

While these apps are quite new and doing well, they may have some serious competition in the future due to the entrance into this market by some large players. The Internet market behemoth Amazon has stepped into the alcohol delivery game in London and Seattle with its new Amazon Now, one-hour delivery service. Although Amazon is only doing alcohol delivery in these two cities at this time, Amazon is likely to expand if it works. But folks at Drizly and Minibar don’t have to worry yet, and they seem to being doing a good job at bringing tasty libations to happy customers in cities across the country.

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Beer+Delivery%21/2341557/283743/article.html.

Garrison Of Good Beer

Scott Kaplan

Right at the edge of Dover, N.H.’s Upper Square sits Garrison City Beerworks. Named after the nickname of the City of Dover, it’s one of the state’s newest nano breweries. Owners Gabe Rogers and Mike Nadeau run the brewery and business together with Assistant Brewer Nicole Gray and Rogers’ wife Kate, who is the tasting room General Manager.

Rogers grew up in Wolfeboro, N. H., and after high school he worked in various restaurant kitchens as a chef. As an eager overachiever, he found himself managing Joe Green’s Garden Café on Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro by the time he was 20 years old. Working in the restaurant industry exposed Rogers to good beer, most notably the Lucknow brand from Castle Springs Brewing, the beer he now credits with his interest in craft beer.

The Beerworks opened in December 2014 in the Central Avenue storefront formerly occupied by Rogers’ mother’s consignment shop after she retired. But before that, as with most professional brewers, Rogers started homebrewing in 2005. At the time, there weren’t any homebrew supply shops anymore on the Seacoast — both Stout Billy’s and Brewer Cook & Baker being long closed — which gave Rogers the idea of opening his own shop in Dover. In 2010, he opened Yeastern Homebrew Supply, first in the basement of the consignment shop, and then as the business grew in the larger upstairs space in the back of the shop. It was there in the homebrew shop that Rogers met Mike Nadeau as a customer. Nadeau loved Roger’s homebrewed beer Anomalous, and that’s what started the Beerworks journey for both of them.

The brewing team operates a threebarrel Heat Exchanger Recirculating Mash System (HERMS), where a hot liquor tank supplies heating water through an exchanger in the mash tun to maintain or raise mash temperatures. This avoids the possibility of scorching the wort as can be done with Recirculating Infusion Mash Systems ( RIMS) or tuns that are directly fired.

In the tasting room, patrons will find N. H.’s only “crowler” machine. A crowler is a 32-ounce can-growler for beer to-go from the brewery. Crowlers are CO2 purged, filled from the tap and then a conventional aluminum lift-top disc lid is crimped on to seal it shut. Jeremy Rudolph of Oskar Blues Brewery in Lyons, Colo., originally developed the crowler. Rogers bought the sealing machine from Oskar Blues and continues to buy unlabeled crowlers by the pallet from the brewery as well, in order to avoid having to order an entire truckload of the cans. Garrison City labels are applied to the cans once they arrive.

“To me, it’s a great package,” Rogers said of the crowler. “It makes the most sense for hoppy beers.”

To make take-home beer a bit more accessible and available at retail stores, Rogers recently purchased a 16-ounce twohead canning machine. He said it’s much faster than filling crowlers, and he’ll be canning two batches per week on the new equipment. The first 16-ounce can release was Khaos Double IPA (7.5% ABV) in early October, followed by Anomalous IPA. The 16-ounce can artwork is by Allison Haley, a freelance artist who currently lives in California and is a long-time friend of Rogers’ wife Kate.

When the brewery first opened, Rogers was brewing only once or twice a week to keep four beers on tap. Most patrons were only coming in for sample paddles, and not many crowlers were going out the door. As business picked up, people started to come in for more crowlers than samples. A recent customer ordered 60 at once, much to the surprise of tasting room manager Kate.

The crew is now brewing four times a week and keeping six beers on tap. Rogers confessed, though, that with about a dozen restaurants and stores selling Garrison City Beerworks’ beers, he’s having a tough time keeping all six tasting room lines running. Upwards of 12 barrels of beer per week are being sold through the tasting room and offpremises. Many of the further afield places such as the Pour House and Brewtopia (both in Keene, N.H.) drive four hours round-trip to Dover to pick up beer from Beerworks.

“We feel honored that people will come that far for our beer,” Rogers said.

The crew regularly brews almost 20 different recipes, and Rogers usually develops a recipe in his head and gets straight to the full-scale brewing without test batching.

Rogers is already looking towards the future with plans for more and larger fermenters and perhaps a larger brewhouse as well to take over the space of his nowclosed homebrew shop. The homebrew shop closed to allow him to focus more on the brewery.

“I’m dreaming,” he said, “but dreams do come true.”

Garrison City Beerworks
455 Central Ave.
Dover, N.H. 03820
603-343-4231
www.garrisoncitybeerworks.com

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Garrison+Of+Good+Beer/2341562/283743/article.html.

Lone Wolfe Of

Scott Kaplan

Lone Wolfe Brewery owner/brewer Graham Combes at home behind his bar. PHOTO BY SCOTT KAPLAN

The idea started out as one-man with a one-barrel brewery in Wolfeboro, N.H., so it was kind of a no-brainer for brewer-owner Graham Combes to name his brewery Lone Wolfe. “It was a fool-hardy decision,” Combes said of the name, but it stuck. How he got there is a bit more protracted.

Combes is originally from Ohio, and he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Visual Journalism from the Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, Calif., in 2009. While there he met his wife, Jen, in the same program.

After graduation, Jen wanted to move back east to New Jersey where they settled for a few years. Combes worked a series of decidedly un-journalistic and un-brewery related jobs from selling cars to landscaping to tending bar and waiting tables.

All the while, Combes was homebrewing. A self-confessed nerd, he liked the science behind brewing, he was getting good feedback from friends about his beers and he wanted to brew more. Warsteiner Dunkel is the beer Combes credits for his obsession.

“All my friends were drinking Natty Light and Busch, and I couldn’t handle it,” he said of his taste in beer. “I tried everything I could get my hands on,” he added, and he decided to see what it would take to brew it himself. German styles are what started it. At first Combes couldn’t even handle IPAs, but he got into fresh stouts, which became his introduction to English styles, and Belgian ales came next.

A Move to New Hampshire

In 2011, Combes’ lease was up in New Jersey, and he moved to New Hampshire. “I can’t really reconstruct now how I ended up in Wolfeboro,” he said of the unusual town in which to end up as a newcomer to the state. But the nation’s oldest summer resort town has proved to be an idyllic setting for him, his wife and their two young children.

The brewery opened in June 2014, and Combes did much of the carpentry and construction work himself, further driving home the idea of the brewery’s name. Much of the construction was done with reclaimed pallet wood, giving the space a rustic feel. The entire brewery, kitchen and tasting room take up only about 800 square feet, so it truly is a small operation. The brewery has three electric fired Blichmann kettles, and 18 barrels of fermentation space. Combes said he does it all pretty much by feel, and he manages to keep eight beers on tap by brewing four to five times per week.

“I’d brew more if I had more fermentation space,” he said. “My ultimate goal is to move the brewery to my farm about five minutes out of downtown.”

The brewery does no advertising, and Combes has relied on word of mouth and a few brew fests to get the word out about the brewery. It must be working, because he said he’s had over 200% growth in sales in the past year. There’s a lot of foot traffic during tourist season, and the tasting room was open six days a week during the summer. Winter hours are scaled back to Thursday, Friday and Saturday only.

The Beers

The winter will also give Combes a chance to focus more on his four flagship beers and distribution of kegs. He’d like to sell 70 to 80 one-sixth-barrel kegs a month in about 40 locations in the long run, and only bottle special releases and bigger beers in smaller quantities. The flagship beers are Gose, Farmhouse Ale, Robust Porter and American IPA.

Combes doesn’t tend to specifically name his beers, but mostly calls them by their style names. This includes Citra IPA, a 100% Citra hop beer that won a gold medal at the New England Homebrewer’s Jamboree this year.

“People take to the single-hop beer, because they feel it defines a hop,” he said of the popularity of such beers. Citra is the only single-hop beer he makes now after experimenting with others, as he prefers the complexity of blended hops. Philoxenia, a pale ale from his Labor of Love series, did get a special name. It was originally supposed to be a one-off beer, but it’s been so popular he’s had to keep brewing it. The name means hospitality, or love of strangers.

Food is now served in the tasting room, which allows the brewery to sell full pints for on-premise consumption. Jen makes all the food including a selection of panninis and soft pretzels. There’s even a pint club with about 100 mugs available. Jen handpainted the mugs, and each one was fired in her home oven.

Lone Wolfe Brewing
Wolfeboro Marketplace
39 North Main St.
Unit C1
Wolfeboro, N.H. 03894
603-515-1273
www.thelonewolfe.com

Read the full article at http://ybnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Lone+Wolfe+Of/2341590/283743/article.html.

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